Brother Jake: True Believing Mormon Dude

by: Bro. Jake

June 6, 2013

brother jakeFor my latest endeavor, I decided that instead of my typical talk-real-fast style, I’d try something wildly different–sing-real-fast. So, without further adieu, I give you The True Believing Mormon Dude. I hope you enjoy it.

Now that you’ve seen that, you may be wondering–what exactly was I trying to say with this video? And the short answer is, I don’t really know. I mean, sure, there were a few things I had in mind as I made it–the conformity that Church membership and participation breeds, the homogeneity of belief among Mormons, etc.–but we were all aware of those things. Or at least we are all aware that many people see Mormonism that way.

Poking fun at the quirks of Mormon culture is easy. It’s a lazy man’s game, which works out great for me, since I am a lazy man. But the far more interesting issue to me is what will happen to Mormonism in the future. The current super-homogenized Church structure (and culture) is in large part a product of Correlation, but I think we may be in entering a new chapter in the relationship between Mormonism and American culture as Mormonism continues to drift into the mainstream. Now, when I say “drift into the cultural mainstream,” I’m not saying that now everyone wants to be a Mormon or people don’t find Mormon beliefs odd anymore. I’m just arguing that in the wake of recent events (two Mormon presidential candidates, The Book of Mormon on Broadway, etc.), awareness of Mormonism is becoming a part of the common cultural language in the U.S.

The transition from being a largely unknown oddball to a quirky kid brother in American culture is one I’m curious to see unfold. What will the implications be for the members? Will the increased awareness in the outside world cause a dehomogenization of beliefs and participation levels among Mormons? Will our tendency to see ourselves as the object of persecution make us more insular? Will something completely different happen that I’m not even considering right now because I haven’t thought of it?

You people are smart. You tell me.

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7 Responses to Brother Jake: True Believing Mormon Dude

  1. Paul on June 6, 2013 at 8:00 AM

    Well, you’ve demonstrated what Stone and Parker did without all the profanity: take a catchy tune and mash up smatterings of beliefs and it’s pretty easy to poke fun and leave the TBDs feeling a little icky at the end of it.

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  2. Jeff Spector on June 6, 2013 at 9:00 AM

    It’s clever, it’s impressive, but it is a caricature that so many like to paint. It’s a shame really and I don’t think that most members deserve such treatment. They are just trying to life their live the best they know how.

    Poking fun is a fun thing to do, but after a while the same old thing gets old.

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  3. alice on June 6, 2013 at 10:27 AM

    I think you are a talented guy with a great sense of humor.

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  4. Watcher on June 6, 2013 at 12:06 PM

    I agree with alice. You are a very talented guy.

    I think that teaching through song is an incredibly powerful way to get points across to people. The rapidity of throwing out facts is another enhancement to the learning process which causes the mind to kick into gear.

    Of course, humor is the topping on the cake, when appropriate, although using humor to criticize or belittle religious beliefs that people hold sacred will always leave people “feeling a little icky at the end.”

    Frankly, sometimes the truth leaves people feeling a little icky no matter how it is presented.

    I have recently been impressed with the videos that show an artist doodling pictures and writing (in fast motion) during an audio narrative. That is an effective way to get points across.

    i would love to see someone merge the two concepts together. Fast doodling, picture drawing and writing with a witty fast moving song narrative.

    Do you do this commercially?

    I would be curious to know how much would you charge to take the historical issues provided in the bullet points of the following post and create a similar song out of it?

    http://onewhoiswatching.wordpress.com/2013/06/05/documenting-gods-relationship-with-his-people-in-the-latter-days/

    …Or would something like that even cross your line?

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  5. Hawkgrrrl on June 7, 2013 at 2:27 AM

    I dunno. The voice is so positive and doggone likeable it’s hard to see it as mocking, or so I think.

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  6. Roger on June 7, 2013 at 7:59 AM

    It would take a huge amount of effort to take offense at any of it. It was clever and authentic at the same time.

    Ickiness wasn’t an issue. I have felt ickier reading certain conference talks. Rather than the angst that one can experience in trying to sort out the various conundra of Mormonism, one finds oneself toe tapping to a tune stuck in one’s mind.

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  7. James on June 8, 2013 at 3:20 PM

    True Blue Bro. Jake said:

    >”The transition from being a largely unknown oddball to a quirky kid brother in American culture is one I’m curious to see unfold. What will the implications be for the members? Will the increased awareness in the outside world cause a dehomogenization of beliefs and participation levels among Mormons? Will our tendency to see ourselves as the object of persecution make us more insular? Will something completely different happen that I’m not even considering right now because I haven’t thought of it?

    You people are smart. You tell me.”

    James: It’s hard to say for such, but if the past is any indicator, the rest of society will be more informed of Mormonism, and Mormonism will continue to change/modify its doctrines and practices to become more and more like the rest of society.

    Brigham Young said:

    “There is nothing that would so soon weaken my hope and discourage me
    as to see this people in full fellowship with the world, and receive no more
    persecution from them because they are one with them. In such an
    event, we might bid farewell to the Holy Priesthood with all its blessings,
    privileges, and aids to exaltations, principalities, and powers in the
    eternities of the Gods”. (Brigham Young, April 8, 1862, JD 10:32)

    “When we see the time that we can willingly strike hands and have full
    fellowship with those who despise the Kingdom of God [and its'
    doctrines] know ye then that the Priesthood of the Son of God is out
    of your possession.” (Brigham Young – J.D. 4:327)

    “When the spirit of persecution, the spirit of hatred, of wrath and
    malice ceases in the world against this people, it will be the time
    that this people have apostatized and joined hands with the wicked,
    and never until then; which I pray may never come.” (Brigham Young –
    J.D. 4:327)

    “There is nothing that would so soon weaken my hope and
    discourage me as to see this people in full fellowship with the world,
    and receive no more persecution from them because they are one with
    them” (Jrnl. of Disc., vol. 10,

    Jesus promised persecution. It is a natural result of following truth.
    John Taylor understood the principle — “There is still that same
    spirit of antagonism existing between truth and error … let a man
    join this Church …when he became a servant of God, the powers of
    darkness were let loose upon him; men began to persecute him and speak
    evil of him, and his name was cast out as evil. This is the lot of
    every man that receives the truth — I don’t care where he comes from”
    (Jrnl. of Disc., vol. 7, p. 195).

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