Saved or Not Saved? (Weekend Poll)

By: wheatmeister
June 28, 2014

I thought God would have white hair on his arms.

“Who then can be saved?”  Wouldn’t you like to know?

How many will be saved? (Choose the best answer)

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...

Discuss.

Tags: , ,

15 Responses to Saved or Not Saved? (Weekend Poll)

  1. wonderdog on June 28, 2014 at 4:42 AM

    You have to define “saved” first.
    Saved from death?
    Saved from hell?
    Both of the above?

    Fan Favorite! Do you like this comment as well? Thumb up 4

  2. larryco_ on June 28, 2014 at 5:13 AM

    I’m with wonderdog on this. There’s no way to answer this for a believing LDS without defining 1) what we’re being saved from (as mentioned above), 2) factoring in the LDS concept of Spirit World/Spirit Prison and “hell” vs. outer darkness, and 3) factoring in the LDS concept of exaltation and the degrees of glory. Without this, each of your options can fit into one or more definitions of being saved, even though they contradict one another. Yeah, those pesky modern revelations really throw a wrench into the whole “heaven or hell/in or out” concept.

    As for me, being saved would include a nice piece of bottom cloud (as opposed to bottom land), a harp that never goes out of tune, a great burger joint within walking distance, and all the sports channels.

    Like this comment? Thumb up 1

  3. Hoffbego on June 28, 2014 at 6:08 AM

    One other thing that needs to be defined is “everyone”. All of God’s children include the spirits that follow Satan. With that in mind then the only correct answer is the first.

    Like this comment? Thumb up 0

  4. Braeden on June 28, 2014 at 6:24 AM

    There’s also that pesky problem of there being no god to save us from anything or anything to save us from (thus my “other” answer).

    Fan Favorite! Do you like this comment as well? Thumb up 4

  5. Howard on June 28, 2014 at 6:54 AM

    Being saved is a process of opening and connecting with Christ, it is a relationship not a ritual.

    Like this comment? Thumb up 3

  6. Left Field on June 28, 2014 at 7:13 AM

    According to LDS teachings, all except the sons of perdition will inherit glory in the hereafter. That was even a clue on Jeopardy! once. All three contestants were stumped.

    Like this comment? Thumb up 3

  7. Left Field on June 28, 2014 at 7:22 AM

    I found it in the archives. 13 October 2009, The Afterlife for $400.

    “This faith dating from 1830 says everyone except a few God-rejecters will see glory in the afterlife.”

    Like this comment? Thumb up 1

  8. NewlyHousewife on June 28, 2014 at 9:10 AM

    Based on a Bednar’s stance on agency, children use their agency to get baptized after that there is no agency, it would appear everyone is saved whether they like it or not.

    Like this comment? Thumb up 1

  9. Brian on June 28, 2014 at 9:24 AM

    Then there are those whose 14 year old daughters choose to marry well.

    Like this comment? Thumb up 2

  10. Meg Stout on June 28, 2014 at 1:13 PM

    I would have answered: Everyone that wants to be, and they will demonstrate this desire by either accepting the necessary saving ordinances in this life or accepting the required proxy ordinances performed on their behalf after this life. But you had these as several different answers I could not simultaneously select.

    By the way, the First Presidency and Quorum of the Twelve Apostles put out a formal statement regarding apostasy, clarifying that questions are OK.

    Like this comment? Thumb up 1

  11. hawkgrrrl on June 28, 2014 at 5:46 PM

    “the First Presidency and Quorum of the Twelve Apostles put out a formal statement regarding apostasy, clarifying that questions are OK.” I’m glad for this, and yet I hesitate to celebrate given what it says about Mormons that we need to be told that.

    Like this comment? Thumb up 3

  12. Kullervo on June 28, 2014 at 8:31 PM

    Well, everyone that wants to be saved will be saved by grace alone through faith in Jesus Christ alone.

    Except that nobody really wants to be saved, except those who are predestined by God and effectually called.

    “All those whom God hath predestinated unto life, and those only, He is pleased, in His appointed time, effectually to call, by His Word and Spirit, out of that state of sin and death, in which they are by nature to grace and salvation, by Jesus Christ; enlightening their minds spiritually and savingly to understand the things of God, taking away their heart of stone, and giving unto them an heart of flesh; renewing their wills, and, by His almighty power, determining them to that which is good, and effectually drawing them to Jesus Christ: yet so, as they come most freely, being made willing by His grace.” (Westminster Confession of Faith)

    Like this comment? Thumb up 0

  13. Tom D on June 29, 2014 at 7:53 AM

    There is scripture and then there is reality. Based on numerous reports, conscious awareness persists beyond death of the body for everyone, so no one, as far as we know, goes into oblivion upon death. What an individual experiences upon dying will vary upon the life that a person has lived. Most report experiencing a world dominated by light and love while others, who have lived lives of hatefulness, will likely find themselves in a region of darkness where they experience a misery devoid of light and love. Fortunate for this latter group, they can change their thinking and, responding to ministering angels, eventually themselves experience light and love. So, not only can everyone be saved from the consequences of death by continuing to be conscious, but everyone can eventually be saved from the separation from God’s love. Why would we want things to be otherwise? .

    Like this comment? Thumb up 0

  14. anajay on June 29, 2014 at 8:06 PM

    hawkgrrl at 5:46pm “I’m glad for this, and yet I hesitate to celebrate given what it says about Mormons that we need to be told that.”

    Some were saying, from the start, sentiments similar to what was expressed by the First Presidency — that there is a difference between earnestly seeking answers to spiritual questions and engaging in a public campaign as did KK and company.

    Those who saw the public advocacy of female ordination, distribution of materials in contradiction to current teaching, and defiance in the face of requests to stop, and considered it just “asking questions,” probably do need to be told that, given the types of comments I’ve read over the last week.

    And, as usual, Meg Stout has it right in #10.

    Like this comment? Thumb up 0

  15. New Iconoclast on June 30, 2014 at 7:21 AM

    I had the same problem with the poll that Meg did (#10), so I didn’t answer. Usually I can find some minimally acceptable alternative, but not in this one.

    Hawk in #11 says, I’m glad for this, and yet I hesitate to celebrate given what it says about Mormons that we need to be told that. Given the radical overreaction in some quarters to Sister Kelly’s excommunication (“OMG! This means you can never question anything! We are forever silenced!”), it’s probably necessary. I understand the feeling, but I don’t understand not taking a deep breath and looking at actual facts. I know that people don’t do that, I just don’t know why not. It just seems like an unnecessarily stressful way to live.

    Of course, it was even more needed to squelch the radical overreaction in other quarters (“Thank goodness! This means they can never question anything! Let the Inquisition begin! They are forever silenced!”) It’s enough to make any thoughtful Saint retreat to a Trappist monastery until it all blows over. Anyone want to join me?

    In re. #12, I love the Westminster Confession; its brilliant twisting of Scripture, use of sophistry, and tortured logic stand (along with papal history and the Nicene Creed) as among the finest evidences of the Great Apostasy and examples of the need for the Restoration.

    Like this comment? Thumb up 0

Leave a Reply

Subscribe without commenting

Archives

%d bloggers like this: