So what ARE we supposed to eat???

By: shenpa warrior
April 20, 2011

A friend of mine has been on the Paleo Diet for a while: Eat like a cave-person and lose weight.

Another friend recommended The China Study to me: Don’t eat animal proteins and you won’t get cancer.

A magazine my wife gets pushes the Eat-Clean diet: Don’t eat anything with more than three ingredients, and you can keep fat off forever!

These and the million other diets often claim to be “THE” way that humans should eat, all based on research.

Don’t eat beef.

Don’t eat meat.

Don’t eat fruit.

Don’t eat broccoli.

Don’t eat eggs.

Eat eggs.

Don’t eat tofu.

Eat tofu.

Eat organic.

Don’t eat organic.

Don’t drink cow’s milk.

Have a breast-milk sundae!

Never, ever eat sugar. It’s worse than crack.

With so many passionate truth claims, is there really a “True and living” way any given human being should eat? How do you sort all this out? What are we supposed to be eating? Are any of these sects correct?

Tags: , , , , ,

45 Responses to So what ARE we supposed to eat???

  1. Justin on April 20, 2011 at 7:17 AM

    My approach to eating comes largely from here — I think taking an evolutionary approach to dieting is the “One True Way” to avoid the agents of the diseases of civilization.

    I also like diet advice to focus on local solutions to local problems. A lot of the vegan-pushers want us to stop feeding meat animals so that we can feed the grains to Africans — but if you ask the Africans, they’d really like less grain-gruel and more meat.

    Eating should be about good, local, whole foods. Mostly meat, fish, and vegetables with some traditionally prepared whole grains and legumes.

    Like this comment? Thumb up 4

  2. SilverRain on April 20, 2011 at 8:02 AM

    I get mine from here. It’s stood me in VERY good stead.

    The most similar term is “flexitarianism”. A very subtle, very quiet movement that is slowly gaining popularity.

    Like this comment? Thumb up 2

  3. shenpa warrior on April 20, 2011 at 8:04 AM

    I’m not against eating local, but I’d have a hard time giving up bananas!

    Like this comment? Thumb up 1

  4. Alice on April 20, 2011 at 9:20 AM

    My former college roommate writes a lot about diets at her blog http://www.thegreatfitnessexperiment.com She tried the primal diet (which I think is similar to paleo?)

    Her most successful “diet” has been intuitive eating: http://www.intuitiveeating.org/

    For me, I try to go by the WoW, including limiting my meat (though I do still eat more than just “in times of famine and winter”. I try to stick to ethically raised meat to make up for it.

    I don’t believe in diets, I believe in eating mostly healthy food, but not restricting myself if I want a treat. I think in general “diets” are not successful because they are not sustainable, and to be healthy, we have to have good eating habits over our whole lives. That doesn’t mean we can’t have a piece of cheesecake if we want one, just not as a meal, and not excessive amounts every day. Moderation in (most) things.

    Fan Favorite! Do you like this comment as well? Thumb up 4

  5. Alice on April 20, 2011 at 9:21 AM

    Also, replace all your white stuff with brown stuff (pasta, rice, bread..)

    Quina is tasty and a great substitute for rice or couscous.

    Like this comment? Thumb up 3

  6. Alice (alliegator) on April 20, 2011 at 9:22 AM

    That’s quinoa. I’ll stop posting now…

    Like this comment? Thumb up 0

  7. Mike S on April 20, 2011 at 9:59 AM

    I try to just eat healthy. I buy local when I can. I buy organic when I can. For meats, eggs, dairy, etc., I buy hormone-free, additive-free, etc. When I do buy ground beef, for example, I like grass-fed organic.

    As far as what we are “supposed to eat”, perhaps the only dietary recommendation we have as LDS folks is the WofW.

    Sometimes this overlaps with a healthy diet – eat less meat (or not at all), emphasize grains and vegetables, avoid tobacco, etc.

    Sometimes this is contrary to a healthy diet – a glass of wine each day is healthy for you according to the majority of studies I’ve seen; like 90% of the world, I drink a moderate amount of caffeine but because I can’t drink tea or coffee (which also appear healthy in moderation), I drink Diet Coke, which I know is artificial and terrible for me

    Ironically, the original Word of Wisdom as lived by Joseph Smith is likely MORE healthy than the version we follow today. In his time, they actually did eat meat sparingly, they did drink coffee, they actually did drink an occasional glass of wine or have a beer, etc.

    Fan Favorite! Do you like this comment as well? Thumb up 12

  8. kuri on April 20, 2011 at 10:13 AM

    Fan Favorite! Do you like this comment as well? Thumb up 7

  9. Jon on April 20, 2011 at 10:42 AM

    I’m addicted to food, I’ve thought about giving it up, but it’s just too hard.

    Fan Favorite! Do you like this comment as well? Thumb up 4

  10. Mike S on April 20, 2011 at 10:45 AM

    Whatever it is, we are eating TOO MUCH. For a staggering look at obesity in the US, check out the following link. We pretty much have the same genetics – it’s diet and activity.

    http://www.cdc.gov/obesity/data/trends.html

    Like this comment? Thumb up 1

  11. will on April 20, 2011 at 10:59 AM

    “Eating should be about good, local, whole foods. Mostly meat, fish, and vegetables with some traditionally prepared whole grains and legumes.”

    This is the right answer, coupled with Mike S — eat less.

    Fan Favorite! Do you like this comment as well? Thumb up 6

  12. Jon on April 20, 2011 at 11:33 AM

    Yeah, in my younger years (20s), I could eat whatever I wanted, I exercised quite a bit. Now that I’m older (early 30s) I don’t exercise quite so much and been putting on the pounds (about 40 over right now). I’ve started on Weight Watchers, which seems to work pretty well since it makes me cognizant of what I eat.

    It is interesting since My wife and I are health conscientious. We eat mostly vegan with the occasional fish or chicken, rarely eat sweets, and don’t eat that much bread, and only whole grains. It just when we go out of the house that there is so much bad foods to devour.

    Here’s to weight watchers!

    Like this comment? Thumb up 0

  13. Jon on April 20, 2011 at 11:38 AM

    As for the eating locally produced foods, don’t know if that is such a big deal. Since it probably consumes more energy for 50 people to go to the farmers market every week than it does for the ships/trucks to ship the food. The ships/trucks are so energy efficient that they can go clear around the world and still sell the food for cheaper than buying locally. Just shows you how amazingly efficient the whole system is.

    We do participate in a local CSA. Mainly because the quality of the food is much higher. Nothing beats fresh fruits and vegetables. It’s like going to central America and buying a fresh mango for $0.10 vs buying one here in the states. The one in Central America is so much better. After getting back to the states it takes a year or two to start eating the mangoes here again.

    Like this comment? Thumb up 0

  14. philomytha on April 20, 2011 at 12:31 PM

    You forgot gluten. It’s the source of all gastrointestinal, neurological, and behavioral problems, according to my SIL.

    My impression is that pretty much any diet is healthy as long it’s one that ISN’T followed by Americans.

    Like this comment? Thumb up 2

  15. Alice (alliegator) on April 20, 2011 at 12:57 PM

    Jon (13)- those 50 people would still have to go to the grocery store to buy their trucked-in produce if they weren’t buying locally. Buying locally as much as possible is a HUGE thing. Especially if we’re thinking about food security. So much of what we eat is dependent on oil for production and transportation, an oil shortage for whatever reason, could reek havoc on what we could find on our grocery store shelves. That’s why supporting local farmers is so important.

    Like this comment? Thumb up 2

  16. Jon on April 20, 2011 at 1:13 PM

    @Alice,

    Those 50 people would still likely drive to the grocery store, so they would be making different trips. I was just pointing out that the argument that food that is shipped thousands of miles is bad, is a fallacy. If there was an oil shortage making the extra trip to go to the farmers market might actually be more expensive than it would be just to go to one place, the supermarket. Unless you have a garden in your back yard it wouldn’t make a whole lot of sense to spend money on all that extra gas, if fact you would probably carpool to the supermarket with your friends, if it were that bad. Buying local is a luxury for us that can afford it.

    I’m not saying it’s bad to buy local, we do, we have the CSA that we get food from. I’m just saying the best argument, that I know of, is for quality of food.

    As for food security, I would agree that the more diverse we make food the better. Just like the internet, the more nodes, the better.

    So ideally, we would all have a garden – small or large (which we have, we’re not very good at it yet though).

    Like this comment? Thumb up 0

  17. Alice (alliegator) on April 20, 2011 at 1:17 PM

    Possibly Jon, but not necessarily. In the summer when the garden is producing, I go to the grocery store, maybe once every two weeks.

    Plus, if your grocery store is even 3 miles away, times that by 50 people, it’s still only 300 miles round trip each week. Much less than the mileage your average banana travels.

    Plus, the food at the farmers market is more likely (though not necessarily, I’ll admit) to be grown and harvested without the harmful pesticides and heavy equipment that factory farming uses. Lots and lots of great reasons to buy local where possible.

    Like this comment? Thumb up 3

  18. Alice (alliegator) on April 20, 2011 at 1:19 PM

    And, yes, buying local is a luxury, which is sad. Yet another reason why we need to support it more, help increase demand, and reduce prices so that everyone can afford it.

    Food security for your neighbor means they’re less likely to come raid your garden if they’re hungry.

    Like this comment? Thumb up 1

  19. LuluBelle on April 20, 2011 at 1:49 PM

    I mostly eat fresh fish (my husband loves to fish so we eat a lot of wild seafood), veggies, fresh fruits, whole grains, and lots of Zone bars, Greek yogurt, almond milk, nuts, cheese in moderation, and eggs. As much as I possibly can, we buy organic. We indulge in frozen yogurt, though, liberally but without toppings unless its sprinkled nuts and fruit only. My husband (non Mormon) drinks a coffee every morning. We are also quite active. I personally try to keep my calorie count about 1400 per day, eat every 2.5-3 hours, and focus on treating what I put in my body with a mindset that it’s medicine– if my body doesn’t need it, then I shouldn’t be eating it.

    Like this comment? Thumb up 3

  20. The Other Clark on April 20, 2011 at 2:50 PM

    The list of diets in the original post is one reason the “wisdom of man” falls short of the perfect dietary recommendations of God:

    * Grain-based diet (especially whole wheat)
    * Fresh fruit
    * Minimal meat
    * Eliminate sugar, poison (alcohol), artificial stimulants.

    Like this comment? Thumb up 1

  21. The Other Clark on April 20, 2011 at 2:53 PM

    On the “wine is good” argument, the studies I’ve seen indicate that fresh grape juice has all the same health benefits (antioxidants and resveterol)without the negatives.

    Like this comment? Thumb up 3

  22. The Other Clark on April 20, 2011 at 2:56 PM

    I grew up in a home where drinking Coke was condemned as if it were beer, and faced a major moral dilemma when I went to Mexico on my mission and found they drink cola like water.

    The advice from my mission president was to drink the healthiest thing available (which was usually the coke, since the other option was likely no cleaner than ditchwater.) That’s served as a good rule of thumb for keeping the spirit of the Word of Wisdom for solid foods as well.

    Fan Favorite! Do you like this comment as well? Thumb up 8

  23. Mike S on April 20, 2011 at 3:13 PM

    The Other Clark:

    Just as a question, what is the “negative” of a glass of wine (and we’re obviously not talking about alcoholism here, but just a glass of wine like many people enjoy).

    Also, while antioxidants and resveterol DO have health benefits, there ARE also benefits to moderate alcohol consumption in and of itself (whether in wine, beer, etc).

    Just to quote one study:

    “In other words, the association of moderate drinking and reduced mortality among older adults is reduced but still present when taking into consideration factors that affect both alcohol consumption and mortality

    Fan Favorite! Do you like this comment as well? Thumb up 4

  24. Justin on April 20, 2011 at 3:18 PM

    Here’s a conundrum for the anti-alcohol but pro-monogamy crowd:

    Wine consumption is postively correlated with monogamy.

    From a survey of historical records

    Fan Favorite! Do you like this comment as well? Thumb up 4

  25. Jen on April 20, 2011 at 4:22 PM

    Interesting topic. Maybe this movie will have all the answers. :) http://www.forksoverknives.com/

    Like this comment? Thumb up 0

  26. LuluBelle on April 20, 2011 at 4:51 PM

    If we want to talk about unhealthy choices, I’d put anything with aspertame right at the top of the list. I think it is far worse than a coffee, green tea (which has loads of health benefits and is one of the healthiest beverages around), or even a glass or red wine. I mean, I’m not pro alcohol (I’ve seen the terrible toll alcohol takes in my own extended family).

    Like this comment? Thumb up 4

  27. DR on April 20, 2011 at 5:06 PM

    Lets ponder over this Quote from Claude Fischler… (Nutritional Sociologist)

    “If you are what you eat and don’t know what you are eating, do you know who you are?”

    How is this for an intro:

    Hi I’m Propylene Glycol Alginate, how are you?

    Serious Identity Crisis?

    Like this comment? Thumb up 4

  28. DR on April 20, 2011 at 5:17 PM

    “I grew up in a home where drinking Coke was condemned as if it were beer, and faced a major moral dilemma when I went to Mexico on my mission and found they drink cola like water.

    The advice from my mission president was to drink the healthiest thing available (which was usually the coke, since the other option was likely no cleaner than ditchwater”

    And, coincidentally, the Mexican version is still better than the American version. We like our additives and artificial sweeteners (HFCS), they take the pure cane sugar for theirs. Mmmm.

    But, seriously, we’re a weird lot – condemning drinks that have all of 3 or 4 ingredients while silently adoring our Diet Coke addictions.

    Wine: Grapes. Sometimes sugar. Sometimes yeast. Depending on the quality of the grapes you have. That’s it.

    Beer: Water. Hops. Yeast. Barley or some other starch agent.

    Diet Coke: Carbonated water, Caramel color, Aspartame, Phosphoric acid, Potassium benzoate (to protect taste), Natural flavors, Citric acid, Caffeine.

    Or, my favorite, Mountain Dew: carbonated water, High-fructose corn syrup, concentrated orange juice, citric acid, natural flavors, sodium benzoate, caffeine, sodium citrate, erythorbic acid, gum arabic, calcium disodium EDTA, brominated vegetable oil, and yellow.

    I once had a guy I know state that “mild drinks” as referenced in D&C 89 referred to “drinks like Sprite, 7-up”. Dude happened to be a chemist who worked developing “artificial” ingredients to put into our food, but still, a fun definition.

    Fan Favorite! Do you like this comment as well? Thumb up 5

  29. Jon on April 20, 2011 at 6:20 PM

    @Allice,

    It would be interesting to see an actual analysis of miles driven by consumers vs the trucks to bring us food. The food trucks get 8 to 15 miles/gallon. Some people’s personal trucks only get 15 m/g. So that would be a huge factor.

    I guess we won’t really know unless we see actual data.

    Like this comment? Thumb up 2

  30. PaulM on April 20, 2011 at 7:07 PM

    Alice:

    Increased demand without a larger differential in increased supply merely results in higher prices making “local” food supplies even more of a luxury. Local and organic are neither healthier nor “greener” and they only supress overall production of food leading to higher prices and increased hardship on the poor.

    Mike S:

    I’m surprised you’re quoting the CDC on obesity rates. If one controls for demographic shifts in population (namely age and ethnicity) the obesity “trends” disappear.

    Like this comment? Thumb up 2

  31. PaulM on April 20, 2011 at 7:14 PM

    Overall, the WoW is a terrible dietary guide. It basically advocates a high-carb diet akin to the current USDA food pyramid– a politically generated document completely bereft of any scientific foundation. In fact, a survey of the current science on the subject indicates that animal proteins and saturated fats are critical to a long, healthy life and that a high carb diet has a measurable negative impact on mortality.

    Fan Favorite! Do you like this comment as well? Thumb up 5

  32. Alice (alliegator) on April 20, 2011 at 7:19 PM

    Paul M (30)- I’d like to see your data showing that local food is neither healthier or greener. I disagree, especially since with local food, you can check out where your food is grown, and the practices used to grow it. It’s generally picked fresh and has a shorter travel span before it reaches your table.

    I don’t think production of food is a problem in the US, so if local food production does supress the overall amounts of food produced, I think we’re okay. (although, again, I’d like to see your data, since that doesn’t really make sense to me)

    Factory farming is not sustainable. We’re ruining the soil and eventually it won’t matter how many chemicals we pump into it, it’s not going to keep producing.

    Fan Favorite! Do you like this comment as well? Thumb up 5

  33. Douglas on April 20, 2011 at 7:38 PM

    From a ‘religious’ viewpoint – the old dietary laws proscribing certain items (e.g., pork) are no longer in effect. “What God has called common, let no man call unclean”. D&C 89 gives good counsel but in no way ought to be considered as binding, as, say, the proscription on alcohol or tobacco. You can’t lose your recommend over partaking of the all-you-can-eat ribs night.
    From a health viewpoint – the human body is wonderfully adaptable. I’d say, eat foods in as natural a state as harvest, transport, and storage methods permit. Limit indulgences in sweets, greasy foods, and highly “processed” (lots of salt and sugar) items. Some things are better suited for different climates too.

    Like this comment? Thumb up 3

  34. Stephen Marsh on April 20, 2011 at 8:18 PM

    My diet experience …

    http://ethesis.blogspot.com/search/label/Shangri-la%20Diet

    My “end” point was 189 +/- 10lbs.

    Like this comment? Thumb up 0

  35. mh on April 20, 2011 at 9:13 PM

    I guess I have Passover on the brain. when I saw the title, I thought this was a post speculating what manna was.

    paul, where are you controlling obesity rates by age and ethnicity. it seems to me that children are getting fatter and diabetes related to obesity is skyrocketing, especially in the young. the only effective cure seems to be gastric bypass or similar radical surguries. everything I have seen points to diabetes as a growing problem.

    Like this comment? Thumb up 0

  36. Bishop Rick on April 20, 2011 at 11:12 PM

    Polygamy and Eating leads to death.

    There was a study where they found that 100% of practicing polygamists eventually died.

    Not convinced, they ran the same study for people that ate food.
    They all eventually died too.

    Like this comment? Thumb up 1

  37. hawkgrrrl on April 21, 2011 at 1:02 AM

    For me, the key is 1) monitor caloric intake, 2) weigh daily, 3) don’t eat after 9 pm, 4) don’t eat when not hungry. 1 & 2 are about facing reality, 3 & 4 are about avoiding irresponsible habits. If you monitor your caloric intake, you’ll avoid most foods that aren’t good for you in the process. Spend your calories wisely.

    The WoW is a great diet if you are a physically active itinerant farmer. A person who sits at a computer all day needs to adjust accordingly.

    Like this comment? Thumb up 2

  38. Ryan on April 21, 2011 at 8:50 AM

    @29:

    “It would be interesting to see an actual analysis of miles driven by consumers vs the trucks to bring us food. The food trucks get 8 to 15 miles/gallon. Some people’s personal trucks only get 15 m/g. So that would be a huge factor.”

    If I’m understanding you correct – and I may not be – then you’re arguing that the increased mileage of heading to a farmers’ market or somewhere for local food somehow compares with the trucks that bring food in to your average grocery store from South or Central America. Where that misses the point is that people, ceteris paribus, will drive somewhere to buy their produce – whether it’s the local grocery store OR the local farmers’ market. People are going to drive either way, it’s just a matter of where.

    That leaves the trucks versus the farmers themselves. I’ve sold at a few farmers’ markets where I live and each market has restrictions on where food can come from (most have a 100 mile radius). So if you have 10 farmers coming an average of 25 miles to the market (not that far from my experience), you have 10 farmers driving a combined total of 500 miles that one day to provide food to that one market. If you assume 100 people come, then you get 5 miles per person. To get the same food from South or Central America to the same market will almost always exceed that mileage on a per person basis. To get that same food to a local grocery store, where you’re feeding 500 people, then the economies of scale might line up favorably.

    Where I would disagree with the assertions made in #30 (Paul) is that they highly skew from reality. If you define “healthier” and “greener” in any modern tones, then it’s hard to argue that food that has to travel 5,000 miles to reach my dinner table is either healthier or greener than food grown 10 miles from my home.

    “Increased demand without a larger differential in increased supply merely results in higher prices making “local” food supplies even more of a luxury. Local and organic are neither healthier nor “greener” and they only supress overall production of food leading to higher prices and increased hardship on the poor.”

    How do you know there isn’t an increased production? Like many market dynamics, the market responds to movements. If more people move to “local” foods, more CSAs sprout up to respond to “local” needs. It’s simple market dynamics.

    As to your assertion on the healthiness or greenness, it’s generally lacking in any corroborating information. At the macro level, “real” food will always trump “processed” food – whether we’re talking about something coming from 10 miles or 10,000 miles away. At the micro level, I’d argue that “real” local food will always trump “real” foreign food. I’d much rather support my local farmer with my money than a multi-national conglomerate. At the very least, the stats I’ve seen suggest that 85% of spending on local products/services/businesses stays local, while only 15% of of spending on chain/multi-national corporation/chains stays local. I’d much rather enrich the pocket of a farmer 20 miles away, than a CEO who runs a farm 10,000 miles away. Personal opinion.

    Otherwise, if you have some actual figures I’d like to see them.

    Like this comment? Thumb up 0

  39. Jon on April 21, 2011 at 8:59 AM

    @Ryan,

    I already addressed this. If you go to the farmers market (or actual farm) you most likely also head out to your local grocery market since farmer’s markets don’t sell as much stuff as a grocery store.

    Also, the incredible efficiency of trucks carrying tons of food to the super market out ways the “miles driven” marker. So a more accurate analysis would us energy use of consumer vs energy use of getting things to the market. That’s why I said it is probably fallacious to say that just because x number of miles are traveled to get you your food, therefore it is bad to eat that food. It’s much more complex than that.

    Like this comment? Thumb up 0

  40. Ryan on April 21, 2011 at 9:36 AM

    Jon:

    “I already addressed this. If you go to the farmers market (or actual farm) you most likely also head out to your local grocery market since farmer’s markets don’t sell as much stuff as a grocery store.”

    And the scenario you paint here is incredibly inaccurate. So be it.

    We may be the exception, but I’m part of a CSA with 100+ families. 50+ families of that total get our ENTIRE vegetables for the year from the CSA. We are all similar in that we simply don’t go to the grocery store for vegetable needs. And, you’d be surprised, most farmers’ markets I know sell more vegetables/goodies than grocery stores do – not processed food – but vegetables and fresh baked goods.

    You have your experience, I have mine, but let’s not assume the Utah [where Farmers' markets suck] mindset hold’s sway on everyone.

    And, no matter the metric, you’ll notice not once did I say that it was “bad to eat that food.” I simply said that I would much rather have something local, ceteris paribus, and would much rather support my local economy than some Fortune-500 company who harvests [pun intended] the profits and revenues for projects that have absolutely no effect on my local economy. I was talking from my perspective.

    Like this comment? Thumb up 0

  41. Jon on April 21, 2011 at 10:07 AM

    @Ryan,

    So you still need to go to the grocer to get your fruit, meat, etc. Your not going to completely cut out the grocer.

    I live in AZ. We go to a CSA in the town north of us. They get us quite a bit of vegetables, but they don’t do fruit, not really any farms around here do, maybe because of the late frosts that we always have, I don’t know.

    The “support your local economy” is a economic myth. Trade is good and enriches everyone. If what you desire is fresh fruits and vegetables then buying from your local farmer would make sense and is “good” trade. But to say that we should stop buying things from far away to “support the local economy” is a fallacious argument.

    Look, all I was trying to say is that the issues are more complex and the reasons that people state for buying CSAs can be fallacious. The main reason to purchase local is to get higher quality food.

    Like this comment? Thumb up 1

  42. LuluBelle on April 21, 2011 at 11:37 AM

    Actually from one of the posts above: a calorie is not a calorie. You can eat higher calorie meals and snacks and be far healthier than someone who simply lowers their caloric intake. For instance, almonds, avacadoes, macademia nuts, raw coconut, olives– all are very high in calories and fats but are far better for you to eat than a 250-calorie McDonalds plain hamburger.

    Like this comment? Thumb up 3

  43. Alice (alliegator) on April 21, 2011 at 11:43 AM

    The friend I mentioned in my first comment did an experiment for a year where she drank whole milk, ate full fat everything, coconut oil, etc… but made sure she ate things that were more along the lines of what Michael Pollan would call “real food”, and then she made sure to listen to her body and not overeat, and her cholesterol and all those other medical body numbers improved significantly.

    We’re kind of trained to limit our fat intake, but we replace it with things that are even worse for us (low fat stuff usually has extra sugar or other things to make them taste good). It would be better if we just ate the full fat versions, but paid more attention to not overeating.

    Fan Favorite! Do you like this comment as well? Thumb up 7

  44. Ryan on April 21, 2011 at 6:22 PM

    Jon:

    “The “support your local economy” is a economic myth. Trade is good and enriches everyone. If what you desire is fresh fruits and vegetables then buying from your local farmer would make sense and is “good” trade. But to say that we should stop buying things from far away to “support the local economy” is a fallacious argument.

    I actually don’t go to the grocery store for any of that. I get meats, fruits, veggies AND honey from my CSA.

    Fallacious? I vote with my pocketbook. If I want local (and I do), that’s what I do. So yes, I say we should stop buying things from far away and we should support the local economy. Fallacious that.

    I have many “main” reasons to buy local. Higher quality food, supporting local farmers being two of those many. Fault me all you want, but I do what I do.

    Re: McDonald’s Hamburger

    It should be called the “bionic burger.” McDonalds hamburgers that don’t decompose. Ever.

    Like this comment? Thumb up 2

  45. rob on April 24, 2011 at 8:01 AM

    If I ate locally I would starve..I’m in the desert. Locally could mean the casinos, they have everything and I mean everything at their restaurants and buffets, from all over the world. Fortunately I have a family history of a modified italian diet. Pasta, fruits, vegetables and follow those in season. smaller meals, eat with others around you for conversation and discussion and life is better.

    Like this comment? Thumb up 1

Leave a Reply

Subscribe without commenting

Archives

%d bloggers like this: